Travel blog

What “Aunt” Jess Found: Discovering Flume Gorge




In 1808, 93-year-old “Aunt” Jess Guernsey went fishing and discovered something miraculous. Hidden deep in the mountains of New Hampshire arose a granite flume spanning 800 feet whose walls rose up to 90 feet high, cutting a deep fissure through the wooded landscape. Initially, Aunt Jess had trouble convincing her family of the discovery until they finally relented and came to see the sight for themselves. What they found has since become one of the most spectacular natural wonders in America.




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Topics: Americas


Find Your Adventure: The Rose Parade and our National Parks




On New Year’s Day when the floats of the Rose Parade head down Pasadena’s Colorado Boulevard they will resemble some very famous American landmarks. Created with seeds, wild flowers, and of course roses, the scenes of iconic National Parks like Zion and the Grand Canyon will come to life out of entirely organic materials -- a requirement of the parade.




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Topics: Americas, Rose Parade, US National Parks


You’re Not In Kansas Anymore: Hawaii’s Unique Agriculture




Ask most Americans about farming and images of cornfields and cows at pasture come to mind. But imagine what you could learn by exploring the unique agricultural heritage of the nation’s newest state: Hawaii. The Hawaii Four-Island Agricultural Tour is an exciting look at this tropical paradise. Whether you got your start in the 4-H Club or just appreciate Mother Nature’s creation, there’s a lot you’re going to love.




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Topics: Americas, Hawaii


Strike Up the Band!: The 2016 Rose Parade Marching Bands



In the ancient world of city-states military bands directed the movement of troops on the battlefield. As musicians became less strategic in battle, they moved into ceremonial roles and eventually gave birth to today’s modern marching band. You can still see echoes of this military tradition in the way bands march in formation, wear uniforms and call out instructions like “about face,” “attention” and “forward march.”




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Topics: Americas, Rose Parade


Top 7 Sights to See at Flume Gorge




Hidden deep in the mountains of New Hampshire lies a granite flume spanning 800 feet with walls that soar up to 90 feet high, cutting a deep fissure through the wooded landscape. First discovered in 1808 by 93-year-old “Aunt” Jess Guernsey on a fishing trip, it is considered to be one of America’s top ten most beautiful State Parks.

Rising up from the base of Mount Liberty, Flume Gorge began 200 million years ago during the Jurassic-era. Today, visitors explore the area on wide gravel paths and wooden walkways that snake through covered bridges, past waterfalls and then into the heart of the massive gorge. There are scenic pools, glacial boulders and spectacular mountain views.




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Topics: Americas, New England/Canada


Find Your Adventure: Discovering the 2016 Rose Parade




“Find Your Adventure” is the aptly-named theme of the 2016 Rose Parade -- a joint partnership celebrating the Tournament of Roses and the U.S. National Parks Service. As we welcome the centennial celebration of our national parks, the parade will help to shine light on some of the more memorable moments in the parks’ history.




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Topics: Rose Parade, US National Parks


The Grand Vacation: Tips for Visiting the Grand Canyon




You’re finally doing it -- taking that once-in-a-lifetime pilgrimage to America’s grandest park. Whether you’re peering over the edge or watching the sun creep over its rim, seeing the Grand Canyon for the first time is something you’ll never forget. To make the most of this dream vacation, plan to spend the night in the park. Here are some tips for visiting the Grand Canyon:




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Topics: Americas, Planning a Vacation, US National Parks


It Never Rains on this Parade: Why the Rose Parade is Always Sunny




Back when it all began, the Rose Parade was a way for privileged families with names like Wrigley, Gamble, and Busch to show off their new home in California to friends and family back East. It was 1890 and the group had recently taken up residence in Pasadena’s Orange Grove in palatial homes along what became known as Millionaire's Row.




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Topics: Americas, Rose Parade


American Royalty: Exploring Hearst Castle




Hollywood royalty and the political elite of the 1920s and 1930s would arrive at Hearst Castle via the estate’s airstrip or aboard the private Hearst-owned railcar that regularly made the journey from Los Angeles to the estate in San Simeon, California. From Clark Gable to Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill to Charlie Chaplin, the privileged guests of William Randolph Hearst were uncharacteristically impressed by the 90,000 square foot estate informally called “the ranch.”




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Topics: Americas


The Painted Desert: 5 Things to Do in this Arizona Treasure




Our planet is a canvas upon which is painted the entire history of the earth. Volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, floods, even the constant warming of the sun, combine to change and reshape the landscape. Nowhere is this more evident than in Arizona’s Painted Desert. These rocky badlands in the northern corner of Petrified Forest National Park are a work of art millions of years in the making. Across this vast area, a portion of which rests in the Navajo Nation, you’ll discover every hue colored across the rockface -- from deep purple to crimson red, shocking orange to pale shades of pink. Here are some of the things you can expect to enjoy on your travels to America’s Painted Desert:




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Topics: Americas, US National Parks


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