Travel blog

4 Things to Know Before Your Route 66 Vacation




Affectionately known as “The Mother Road,” Route 66 is a popular tourist destination. People are eager to “get their kicks on Route 66” and experience a simpler time.

Established in 1926 as a transcontinental highway, Route 66 served as the main route for families migrating west during the Great Depression and Dust Bowl. Later, the road transported families eager to see the Grand Canyon and visit Disneyland. As the road’s popularity grew, so did the number of attractions, diners, gas stations, and motels that sprang up along the route.

In the 1950s, the Interstate Highway System was introduced and Route 66 began to lose its relevance as a main road to the west. However, many vacationers still wanted to experience Route 66 and its quirky Americana attractions, so the road gained a new life thanks to tourism. Today, Route 66 retains its quaint charm and remains a popular tourist destination where there are plenty of “kicks” to be had.




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Topics: Americas


10 Best Things to Do In Charleston, SC




When people imagine Southern charm, Charleston, South Carolina is often the first place that comes to mind. The city on Charleston Harbor was founded in 1670, and still retains much of its historical appeal. Cobblestone streets, colonial architecture, and centuries-old military memorabilia are trademarks of the city. Gracefully drooping willow trees and vibrant flowers are found throughout Charleston. Delicious low-country cuisine is plentiful and at its most tasty here in its birthplace. Charleston is friendly, welcoming, and full of incredible places to go, things to see, and experiences to enjoy.




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Topics: Americas


Grand Hotel: 12 Facts and Things You May Not Know




Nicknamed “The Jewel of the Great Lakes,” compact Mackinac Island in northern Michigan is unlike anywhere else in the world. Cars are not allowed on the island, so the moment you step off the ferry you are transported back to a more graceful era. Nowhere is this bygone gentility more strongly felt than at Grand Hotel, an island institution since 1887. One of America’s finest historic hotels is most often reached by horse-drawn carriage, but that’s only the start of what makes it special.




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Topics: Americas


Things to See on the Blue Ridge Parkway




The Blue Ridge Parkway has some of the best views in the eastern United States. You will enjoy incredible mountain vistas, idyllic valleys, thundering waterfalls, and more as you travel through Virginia and North Carolina along this wonderful winding road. A mecca for nature lovers, it has a diversity of animal and plant life including over 100 different types of trees. In addition, it is peppered with culturally and historically significant sites. You can see evidence of the Native Cherokee People, bootleggers, moonshiners, and musicians all along the route.




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Topics: Americas


What to Pack for Greece




From April through September, the weather in Greece is ideal for traveling and sightseeing. You can expect sunny and dry conditions as you explore Athens, Mykonos, Santorini, and more. To prepare for your trip, follow our packing list to make sure you bring all the essentials.




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Topics: Europe, Greece, Travel Tips, Packing Lists


The Best Things to Do in Death Valley




The strikingly beautiful Death Valley National Park in the heart of the Mojave Desert is a land of extremes. It is the lowest, driest and hottest place in the nation with scorching temperatures that can soar above 120 degrees. This eerie desert landscape is as varied as it is beautiful. Dramatic mountains give way to expansive salt flats, sand dunes and unique hillside landscapes. There is much to do experience and see in this stunning stretch of desert. Here are some of the top things to do in Death Valley National Park:




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Topics: Americas, US National Parks


Hawaiian Customs: 10 Dos and Don’ts for Visiting Hawaii



 

It’s 85 degrees, the sun is shining, and the ocean breeze carries just a hint of coconut-scented sunscreen. It’s true that there’s never a bad day in paradise, but that doesn’t mean a slip up in etiquette or a misstep in planning can’t cloud what would otherwise be the perfect trip. However, with these 10 dos and don’ts, you’ll be well on your way to understanding the local culture, and ensuring the Hawaiian vacation of a lifetime.




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Topics: Hawaii, Travel Tips


What To Do In One Day At Bryce Canyon




Bryce Canyon National Park in southern Utah is most famous for its unique rock formations known as hoodoos. The park is home to the world’s largest concentration of hoodoos, which rise high up into the air like totem poles in vivid red, orange, and amber. The park also boasts spectacular natural amphitheaters and bowls, pine forests, high plateaus, and deep valleys. Anywhere youlook in Bryce Canyon is uniquely beautiful, and you can look forward a new jaw-dropping vista at every turn. People often spend just a day or two in Bryce Canyon as part of a trip to multiple national parks, if you plan out your stay—that’s plenty.




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Topics: Americas, US National Parks


How Mount Rushmore Was Constructed




Deep in South Dakota’s Black Hills, surrounded by endless miles of nature, four great American leaders are carved into the broad granite side of a sun-baked mountain. The four presidents on the striking Mount Rushmore National Monument are George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. These massive, silent beacons are visited by over 2 million guests annually. The monument took a team of over 400 workers more 14 years to build, and is considered “an accomplishment born, planned, and created in the minds and by the hands of Americans for Americans.”




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Topics: US National Parks


Alaska's Old Red Light District: Ketchikan, Alaska




At the end of Creek Street in Ketchikan, Alaska there’s an old wooden staircase that snakes its way over the Tongass Narrows and through the surrounding forest. Known as “Married Man’s Trail,” this is what remains of a muddy path along the Ketchikan Creek that once provided discretion for men visiting the city’s numerous brothels. Today, this historic street, which is actually a stilt-mounted boardwalk, offers visitors a unique and interesting look into the tawdry past of a much wilder, Prohibition-era Alaska.




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Topics: Alaska